skip to content

#YOGsocial: The latest posts from YOG stars

Date
17 Sep 2020
Tags
Olympic News, YOG
Olympic.org takes a look at what some former Youth Olympic Games (YOG) athletes are up to by diving into their social media posts.

Arielle Gold

US snowboarder Arielle Gold – who won silver medals in both the halfpipe and slopestyle at the Winter YOG Innsbruck 2012, as well as halfpipe silver at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 – was among a host of athletes to pay tribute to their furry friends on International Dog Day, posting several images of her “stinky soulmate”, Layla the Labrador.


Tímea Babos

Tennis star Tímea Babos – a three-time Grand Slam doubles champion and a bronze medallist at the YOG Singapore 2010 – provided a dose of motivation for her Instagram followers, posting: “There is no telling how many miles you will have to run while chasing a dream.”


Rose Keddell

New Zealand’s Singapore 2010 hockey bronze medallist Rose Keddell provided some fitness inspiration for her followers by sharing a core workout on Instagram alongside some useful tips. “When you want to strengthen your core, think slow and controlled,” she posted. “It’s super important to take your time in each exercise to ensure you’re activating your core correctly. Taking it slow also challenges your stability, which is a nice little added extra.”


Rudy Rinaldi

Monegasque bobsledder Rudy Rinaldi – who won bronze at the Winter YOG Innsbruck 2012 before going on to compete at PyeongChang 2018 – announced on Instagram that he had made the difficult decision to undergo surgery again on a troublesome foot injury, in the hope of being fit for the Olympic Winter Games Beijing 2022. “I fought as much as I could against my own body but it’s time for me to accept that I have to switch off and have the surgery done one more time,” he posted. “I took the decision simply, because after everything I did there is no way I can keep going like this. Better to try to find a positive, whether it be professional or personal. Whatever happens I’ll give my best, as I always have, and wherever life decides to take me I’ll make sure I make the most of it. But I needed to take this decision now. Things might not be able to go back to normal but trying something different is maybe what we need to get there. I feel sorry for my team, it’s going to be hard and stressful but it’s a risk worth taking. Fingers crossed.”

 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I gave everything I could, all my time and my energy. I fought as much as I could against my own body but it’s time for me to accept that I have to switch off and have the surgery done one more time. I took the decision simply, because after everything I did there is no way I can keep going like this. Better to try to find a positive, whether it be professional or personal. What ever happens I’ll give my best, as I always have, and where ever life decides to take me I’ll make sure I make the most of it. But I needed to take this decision now. Things might not be able to go back to normal but trying something different is maybe what we need to get there. I feel sorry for my team, it’s gonna be hard and stressful but it’s a risk worth taking. Fingers Crossed and hopefully #RoadToPekin

A post shared by Rudy Rinaldi (@rinaldirudy) on


Pandelela Rinong

Malaysian diver Pandelela Rinong – a double silver medallist at the YOG Singapore 2010 – shared a ‘throwback’ photo on Instagram of her carrying her nation’s flag during the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games London 2012, where she would go on to make history by becoming the first Malaysian woman to step onto an Olympic podium. “Who still remembers this moment besides myself?” she asked her followers. “I was 19 then, honoured to be the first female flagbearer for the Malaysian contingent at the London Olympic Games Opening Ceremony. I have no idea where to look or that my team are a little bit behind because I walk too fast, all I know was that I have to hold the flag straight and high, and at the same time put my heart in the right place. Two weeks later, I was the first female Olympic medallist for my country. I'm grateful to be given many opportunities to represent my country, platforms to showcase my talent, and chances to make my country proud. Thank you, Malaysia!”

 

 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Who still remember this moment besides myself? I was 19 then, honoured to be the first female flag bearer for Malaysian contingent at the London Olympic Games opening ceremony.🇲🇾 I have no idea where to look or that my team are a little bit behind because I walk too fast, all I know was that I have to hold the flag straight and high, and at the same time put my heart in the right place. 2 weeks later, I was the first female Olympic medallist for my country.🥉 I'm grateful to be given many opportunities to represent my country, platforms to showcase my talent, and chances to make my country proud. Thank you Malaysia! #momennegaraku

A post shared by 𝕻𝖆𝖓𝖉𝖊𝖑𝖊𝖑𝖆 𝕽𝖎𝖓𝖔𝖓𝖌 (@pandelela) on


Tim-Kevin Ravnjak

Slovenian snowboarder Tim-Kevin Ravnjak – who won halfpipe silver at Innsbruck 2012 before going on to compete at Sochi 2014 and PyeongChang 2018 – felt on top of the world after climbing Slovenia’s highest peak with his girlfriend, Nina. “I couldn't have chosen a better person with whom to climb Triglav for the first time!” he posted.


Jazmin Sawyers

The multitalented Jazmin Sawyers – who won a silver medal for Great Britain in bobsleigh at the Winter YOG Innsbruck 2012 before leaping her way into the Olympic long jump final at Rio 2016 – was among the many athletes who were happy to be back competing in recent weeks. The 26-year-old shared her delight on Instagram as she won the British long jump title with a season’s best of 6.69 metres. “Really happy with a strong series and a win in Manchester,” she posted. “Excited to see what the rest of the season holds.” She also acknowledged the slightly strange nature of the season, following the postponement and cancellation of events due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“A national title always means a lot, but this year it’s strange – we were missing some of our top jumpers, nobody has been able to train “normally” and we’ve all just been making things work as best we can,” she added. “I’m really proud of the work I’ve done this summer and during lockdown, and have been taking every competition as a learning opportunity so that when the major championships are back, I’ll be more ready than I would have been this year. I’ve learned a lot, and I’m grateful to be jumping!”

 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

✨🇬🇧British Champion!✨ Four years after my first British title, I’ve won it back with a season’s best of 6.69m! Really happy with a strong series and a win in Manchester, excited to see what the rest of the season holds in slightly warmer climates 🌞 A national title always means a lot, but this year it’s strange - we were missing some of our top jumpers, nobody has been able to train “normally” and we’ve all just been making things work as best we can - I’m really proud of the work I’ve done this summer and during lockdown, and have been taking every competition as a learning opportunity so that when the major championships are back, I’ll be more ready than I would have been this year. I’ve learned a lot, and I’m grateful to be jumping! Ps, to everyone who is usually in the stands to cheer us on, we missed you! Can’t wait to see you right back here next year 💫 #longjump

A post shared by Jazmin Sawyers (@jazminsawyers) on


Kim Min-seok

The Republic of Korea’s two-time YOG short track gold medallist Kim Min-seok – who went on to win silver and bronze medals at the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018 – tried to boost the morale of those in his homeland as they battle the COVID-19 pandemic by posting an inspirational message on Instagram. “Although everyone is tired and difficult, you can overcome it,” he posted. “Work together, come together with one heart and overcome it.”


Tags Olympic News , YOG
back to top Fr